NEW JAPAN PRO-WRESTLING

PROFILE

Jay White

UNIT

BULLET CLUB 

HEIGHT

186cm 

WEIGHT

100kg 

YEAR OF BIRTH

9 Oct 1992 

Jay White
HEIGHT
186cm 
WEIGHT
100kg 
YEAR OF BIRTH
9 Oct 1992 
PLACE OF BIRTH
Auckland, New Zealand 
DEBUT
19 Feb 2013 
FINISH HOLD

Blade Runner, Uranage, Kiwi Krusher, Snap Saito (Backdrop)

 
TWITTER
@JayWhiteNZ 

BIOGRAPHY

Jay White made his pro debut in September 2013, before attending the December 2014 NJPW tryout, and joining the Dojo in January 2015.

That same month he had his first New Japan match, opposite Alex Shelley. From there he gathered a following for his dedication when training, and his use of spectacular missile dropkicks and cross body attacks. Much like his mentor Prince Devitt, White was a foreigner who Japanese fans flocked to as one of the New Japan Dojo’s own. In June 2016, after a match at Osaka Jo Hall on the Dominion card, White announced his excursion, and headed to America to wrestle for ROH.

After a series of disturbing vignettes aired through the summer of 2017, White returned at Power Struggle that November. Now under the nickname of the Switchblade, White was reborn as a cold hearted master manipulator. While unsuccessful in his redebut opposite Hiroshi Tanahashi at Wrestle Kingdom 12, White immediately showed his propensity for human chess, joining, then betraying CHAOS to become the leader of BULLET CLUB in its ‘New Era’ by the close of 2018.

 White rode a wave of momentum into 2019, beating Okada at Wrestle Kingdom 13, and then, shockingly, Tanahashi at New Beginning to become the youngest non-Japanese IWGP Heavyweight Champion in history. While White’s title reign would only last until April 6 when he was defeated in Madison Square Garden by Kazuchika Okada, there was no doubt that the Cut Throat Era had arrived. Following his title loss, White made it his mission to establish himself as the number one contender for the crown, defeating both Hirooki Goto and Hiroshi Tanahashi in special singles matches before winning the B Block in G1 Climax 29 although he failed to defeat Kota Ibushi in the final match. 

Though he didn’t win the G1, White would insist that his ‘destino’ was even greater; to become the first double Intercontinental and IWGP champion. He took a step toward that goal at Destruction in Kobe in September 2019 when he beat Tetsuya Naito to win the IWGP Intercontinental Championship for the first time, and becoming one of four men involved in the Double Gold Dash of Wrestle Kingdom 14.

Jay White made his pro debut in September 2013, before attending the December 2014 NJPW tryout, and joining the Dojo in January 2015.

That same month he had his first New Japan match, opposite Alex Shelley. From there he gathered a following for his dedication when training, and his use of spectacular missile dropkicks and cross body attacks. Much like his mentor Prince Devitt, White was a foreigner who Japanese fans flocked to as one of the New Japan Dojo’s own. In June 2016, after a match at Osaka Jo Hall on the Dominion card, White announced his excursion, and headed to America to wrestle for ROH.

After a series of disturbing vignettes aired through the summer of 2017, White returned at Power Struggle that November. Now under the nickname of the Switchblade, White was reborn as a cold hearted master manipulator. While unsuccessful in his redebut opposite Hiroshi Tanahashi at Wrestle Kingdom 12, White immediately showed his propensity for human chess, joining, then betraying CHAOS to become the leader of BULLET CLUB in its ‘New Era’ by the close of 2018.

 White rode a wave of momentum into 2019, beating Okada at Wrestle Kingdom 13, and then, shockingly, Tanahashi at New Beginning to become the youngest non-Japanese IWGP Heavyweight Champion in history. While White’s title reign would only last until April 6 when he was defeated in Madison Square Garden by Kazuchika Okada, there was no doubt that the Cut Throat Era had arrived. Following his title loss, White made it his mission to establish himself as the number one contender for the crown, defeating both Hirooki Goto and Hiroshi Tanahashi in special singles matches before winning the B Block in G1 Climax 29 although he failed to defeat Kota Ibushi in the final match. 

Though he didn’t win the G1, White would insist that his ‘destino’ was even greater; to become the first double Intercontinental and IWGP champion. He took a step toward that goal at Destruction in Kobe in September 2019 when he beat Tetsuya Naito to win the IWGP Intercontinental Championship for the first time, and becoming one of four men involved in the Double Gold Dash of Wrestle Kingdom 14.

FINISH HOLD

  • photo

    Blade Runner

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